Kathleen Z.

News of the World

Wednesday, October 11, 2017
Paulette Jiles
News of the World
Captain Jefferson Kyle Kidd travels through post-Civil War Texas performing readings from major world newspapers to paying audiences who are hungry for news of the world.   After becoming a widower and losing his printing business to the Civil War, he takes to the freedom of the road to         make a meager, but honest living.  At the ripe age of 70 he has established a reputation of integrity.  For this reason, a friend asks him to deliver a 10 year
old orphan to her relatives near San Antonio for a 50 dollar gold piece.  The blond blue-eyed orphan had been captured by the Kiowa Indians four years
earlier and recently recovered by the U.S. Army.  The 400 mile trip to the girl’s relatives home is long, and treacherous because of unforgiving terrain
and the anarchy that reigns in much of Texas due to a corrupt Reconstruction administration in the State government.  This is a masterful story told of
family, responsibility, trust and honor and the terrible choices that come when faced with hostile conditions.  Check our catalog
 
Kathleen Z., Administration

Rising Strong

Thursday, June 15, 2017
Brene Brown
Rising Strong
If we are brave enough, often enough, we will fall.  This is a book about what it takes to get back up and wholeheartedly go another round.  The author, Brene Brown, is a researcher who doesn’t write “feel good and get over it lessons”.  Instead, she writes about common denominators of people who find themselves face down in the arena and work through the pain, shame, fear, etc. to pull themselves up and get back into life. Check our catalog
 
Kathleen Z., Administration

Reality Is Not What It Seems: The Journey to Quantum Gravity

Wednesday, April 19, 2017
Carlo Rovelli
Reality Is Not What It Seems: The Journey to Quantum Gravity
The subject of the book is theoretical physics, but it is written in beautiful prose for a reader who has an enthusiasm for the wonder of the universe.  This works even if you don’t understand the complicated equations that are included for those who do understand them.  The author’s enthusiasm is contagious as he presents some amazingly creative ideas that challenge how to think about “reality”.  Some of the best sections are the descriptions of the
evolution of physics from ancient times to present. Check our catalog.
 
Kathleen Z., Administration

The Wright Brothers

Friday, February 24, 2017
David McCullough
The Wright Brothers
This biography gave the Wright brothers, Wilber and Orville, a humanness that I had never read about before.  It made me appreciate their hard work and dogged determination even more than I had in the past.  Both of the brothers had a talent for making and fixing things and a deep curiosity about movement especially flying.  Orville, the younger one, had “dark” periods which is how it was described in the diaries and other documents.  It was probably some sort of deep depression that he suffered from time to time. Their family was close-knit and supportive.  Their father was a well-known traveling minister who had a talent for writing and was well-respected for his integrity.   Their mother died of tuberculosis when they were in their 20s and her death was deeply mourned by the whole family.  Katharine, their younger sister and the only female sibling, was college-educated and very supportive of their work, helping in many ways behind the scenes as their bicycle store and then their airplane business grew.  A very good read.  Check our catalog
 
Kathleen Z., Administration

Between the World and Me

Friday, December 30, 2016
Ta-Nehisi Coates
Between the World and Me

Written as a series of letters to his teenage son, Coates writes this thoughtful memoir addressing race and how it has shaped America.   It moves from his  youthful tough Baltimore neighborhood through Howard University and on to New York and Paris.  It follows his evolution of thinking on race from the influences of Malcom X & James Baldwin to current events.  He describes the systematic violence against blacks in America and makes a case that race itself is a fabrication made by whites who see themselves as “exceptional”.  Coates is an award-winning writer who is frank, insightful and original.   He asks and attempts to answer some difficult questions that afflict our current culture.   Powerful reading.

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Kathleen Z., Administration

 

Inés of My Soul

Friday, November 4, 2016
Isabel Allende
Inés of My Soul

An amazing story of historical fiction about Inés Suárez, a Spanish woman who helped build the nation of Chile in the 1500s.

Inés was born in Spain, but made her way to the New World of South America in search of her husband in about 1537 when she was 30 years old. Although the trip was treacherous, especially for a woman, it is suspected that she wanted to escape the stifling monotonous life in Spain for a woman who is without a husband. She eventually made her way to Peru where she learned that her husband had died in battle.

It is in Peru where Inés becomes the mistress of Pedro de Valdivia, a famous war hero and Field Marshall. She accompanies de Valdivia on his mission to the south to found the country of Chile. Inés’s talents as a seamstress, a cook, and at the healing arts made her a valuable member of the small group of Spaniards who moved into the territory that is now Chile where the natives of the region were inhospitable.

This saga dramatizes the events that are known about the life of Inés Suárez. I recommend this to anyone who likes historical fiction with strong female characters.   

Check our catalog for this book.

 

Kathleen Z., Administration

Burial Rites

Wednesday, September 14, 2016
Hannah Kent
Burial Rites

In the rugged setting of Iceland in 1829, Agnes Magnusdottir is charged with the murder of two men. There are no jails in Iceland at this time, so Agnes is sent to the farm of an assistant District Commissioner. The family on the farm is horrified that they will be caring for a convicted murderer until her execution. Agnes is able to tell her story over many months to the young priest who is charged with preparing her soul for death. Over time, through her hard work and by helping several people with her knowledge of the healing arts, the fear and loathing of her hosts turns to empathy. Her version of events paints a complex story that brings sympathy and understanding. Although it reads like fiction, the story is based on extended research into the last person publicly executed in Iceland. A gripping tale.

Check our catalog for this book.

 

Kathleen Z., Administration

Girls Like Us

Wednesday, July 27, 2016
Sheila Weller
Girls Like Us

Carole King, Joni Mitchell, Carly Simon – and the Journey of a Generation

 

If you are of a certain age and you listen to music, you know these names. Three female singer-songwriters whose careers took off in the 1960s and whose paths crossed in various ways. The biographies of these three iconic musicians start with each of their childhoods and weave their stories throughout the book. These are strong vibrant women who have very human frailties and challenges. A good summer read.

Check our catalog for this book.

 

Kathleen Z., Administration

The Light in the Ruins (Audiobook)

Wednesday, July 13, 2016
Chris Bohjalian
The Light in the Ruins (Audiobook)

Set in the Florence and Tuscany areas where the Rosati family’s ancient villa is located, this story moves back and forth between WWII and 1955. In 1955 two members of the Rosati family are murdered and their hearts are cut out. This provides the mystery and suspense that tie the two decades together. The setting and characters hold your attention until the end.

Check our catalog for this audiobook on CD.

 

Kathleen Z., Administration

Speaking Frankly

Monday, May 16, 2016
Clyde Riley with Doron Levin
Speaking Frankly

A Southern Boy’s Journey from Slaughterhouse to Creation of the World’s Top Hot Dog Brand

 

The author, Clyde Riley, moved to Howell, MI, full time in the late 1980s as he was slowly making his way to eventual retirement in 1994 from a 50-year career in the meatpacking industry, working his way from the slaughterhouse to the Chief Executive Office. This is an inspiring story of a poor farm boy from Alabama who worked hard in every aspect of his life. He rose through the ranks to become the President of Hygrade Food Products. Clyde left this life peacefully in the summer of 2015. It was my privilege to know him in his golden years. I miss his smile and enthusiasm.

Check our catalog for this book.

 

Kathleen Z., Administration

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